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Search Results 0 to 5 of about 6 (some duplicates have been removed)
of the others. every member, hamilton said it makes it immune to entry. dallas' argument in the federalist. nobody forward a little bit into the first federal election. remember, you vote for two members. each has the vote. he says, what if somebody who really doesn't like washington, like maybe their son got overlooked for promotion or some thing. washington had dirty anointed items as a vice presidential possibility. they say what if everybody votes for adam, but a few disgruntled souls strawberry vote from washington, what will happen? atoms will sneak through the presidency. so he writes letters to people in six of the 11 state. we need to throw with seven or eight those for adam. to insure against this possible. not isn't he the guy who said there's no intrigue and somehow it is secure. how could they deluded themselves to doing not? look, they're tired and want to move on, not the intuitive definition is like in entries like people whispering in the corridors of european courts and they don't even entertain the notion that entry can happen through the mail over a period of time and p
steegal following this live from dallas. >> reporter: yeah, megyn. according to the family spokesperson, the president was admitted to the hospital on the day after thanksgiving for this bronchitis. he's being treated at the methodist hospital which is down in houston, and the family spokesperson continues to say that he's in stable condition, his doctors expect that he will be released from the hospital within the next 72 hours. at issue here has apparently been a lingering cough. his son, former president george w. bush and his wife laura, visiting him there over the weekend. listen. >> the entire family has rallied to him both in person. neil lives here in houston, of course, mrs. bush has been vigilant in her visitation, she's been by his side constantly, and other family members have checked in by phone regularly. so we're all pulling for him, but happifully, it's not life threatening. >> reporter: now, in recent years the president has been diagnosed with a form of parkinson's decide, -- disease, but for an 88-year-old, he's had an otherwise clean bill of health. back in 2004 he w
battleground states are expected to >>> in dallas texas, voters are just now starting to show up at the polls. the presidential candidates didn't spend any time in texas in the final days of the campaign because the state is considered a red state. but there are some tight c congressional races. it's brisk out this morning, but the weather will not be a factor today. we are expecting clear skies and a high of 75. >>> finally election day, we get to vote. when we talk about the swing states in this election, we're not just talk about ohio. right now, we want to focus on three states that could really go either way, starting with nevada. anna werner is in las vegas. >> reporter: nevada helped the republicans in 2000 and 2004, voting for george w. bush. but in 2008, barack obama hit the jackpot here, beating john mccain by a whopping 12 percentage points. he's looking for a second big win, a second time around here in this state. the democrats are powered here by organized labor and a latino vote that's now 15% of the total. they've been out knocking on doors, registering new voters, and there a
response. guest: this is the first allegation i have heard of that. host: but go to dallas, texas, independent line. caller: is there a historical comparison to suppression. third-party votes as there is today? guest: i do not know what you mean about a suppression of the third-party voices. there have been the third party boys over there. for example, the debates, back when they were run by the league of women voters and now the debate commission. ross perot felt when he did not meet a certain threshold in the polls that he was not invited into the debates. there are any number of complaints that have been made over the years. it is tough for third-party to get on the ballot. let's be honest. the two major parties are aggressive in perpetuating themselves and they are not interested in fostering strong challengers. host: the history of money in campaigning. guest: it is a perennial issue. i hate to say that it is evergreen, but it has always been with us. going back to 1876, that was an interesting election. he was very much the candidate of industry, business. william jennings b
staples makes it easier to upgrade. >>> another quick look at the morning papers. "the dallas morning news" unless congress acts, one in five americans will be hit with an obscure costly tax, the alternative minimum tax threatens to add $3,700 to middle class americans living in high-cost urban areas. unlike taxes associated with the fiscal cliff the amt would be due almost immediately. and now to another tax in "the new york times." tomorrow the city of richmond, california, could become the first city in america to tax businesses that sell sodas or other sweetened drinks. excellent. outside groups have spent nearly $2.5 million to try to defeat the ballot proposal but healthy americans will vote for it. the tampa bay times after sunday's new york city marathon was canceled, hundreds of runners head ed off to staten island with backpacks filled with supplies for those displaced by hurricane sandy. several other cities throughout the u.s. are opening their doors to runners looking for another marathon. this weekend the pensacola marathon is holding its ninth annual race and has offered spo
Search Results 0 to 5 of about 6 (some duplicates have been removed)

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